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Mantis & Moon Press

The Blade

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Sylvania Advantage

Local Productions Accepted for National Distribution

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Toledo City Paper

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Press Releases

NETA has Approved Wants and Needs, Thunder on the Farm, Thunder on the Mountain for Seeding

Mantis and Moon is excited to announce that several of our titles have been approved for national distribution through NETA.

NETA, or the National Educational Telecommunications Association:

The National Educational Telecommunications Association is a professional association that serves public television licenses and educational entities in all 50 states, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico. We connect people and ideas, by providing quality programming, educational resources, professional development, management support, and national representation.

Our second entry in the Thunder Series, Thunder on the Mountain as well as our documentary, Wants and Needs were approved for distribution through NETA. Our original Thunder Series project, Thunder on the Farm, was resubmitted after a previous run and was also accepted. What does this mean? It means that NETA members, such as numerous PBS stations throughout the country, will have access to play our documentaries and they will be available to a wider audience.

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Mantis and Moons Documentary “Wants and Needs” Now Available to Public Television Stations Nationally; Nature Documentary “Thunder on the Lake” Also Accepted for National Distribution

“Wants and Needs”, a documentary co-production between WGTE Public Media in Toledo, Ohio and Mantis and Moon Moving Pictures and Sound will be distributed by the National Education Television Association (NETA) for public television and has been made available to over 250 local public television stations nationally.

Furthermore, Mantis and Moons third entry in their award winning, nationally distributed “Thunder Series” entitled “Thunder on the Lake” has recently been accepted by NETA for national distribution.

Co-hosted by Gordon Ward and Cap Averill II in Toledo, Ohio, Wants and Needs took over six years to create, and the series is based on the premise that certain cyclical economic trends are actually cause and effect, not coincidental.

“Wants and Needs” used interviews, coordinated by Laura Nowak-Glover from the Sylvania Area Chamber of Commerce, of the general public, economics professors and politicians in order to offer forth a proof that recessions and depressions are generationally driven and have been part of free market economies for hundreds of years.

So with this premise in mind, Mantis and Moon interviewed people from the greatest generation regarding their experiences, memories, and intuition for the economy BEFORE the economic downturn of 2008, then continued compiling interview and political footage throughout the downturn and the resultant governmental actions which happened thereafter.

“Wants and Needs” is not politically driven. The project is socio-economically driven studying only the generational causes of cyclical economic downturn, as opposed to the political finger pointing which is so prevalent these days.

In addition, as opposed to simply reiterating data regarding the issues and abuses which lead to economic downturn, “Wants and Needs” attempts to offer forth solutions for future generations.

Mantis and Moon is also the creator of “Thunder on the Farm” and “Thunder on the Mountain”, which were also distributed for public television by NETA. Together with “Thunder on the Lake” which has also recently been accepted for national distribution, make up Mantis and Moons “Thunder Series”. “Wants and Needs” marks the third project Mantis and Moon has distributed to public television through NETA.

 
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Out of the Shadows

Toledo City Paper

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'Out of the Shadows,' into the fire

Local Filmmakers Seek the Heat of the National Spotlight

Ryan A Bunch

Just three years ago, Cap Averill founded Mantis & Moon Productions, a small film company based out of Bowling Green, Ohio. That same year, the company began filming it’s first feature, then titled “Etchings”. Just shy of two years later, with a little help from the students at Bowling Green State University, in late 2004, Averill and company finished the film, officially titled it “Out of the Shadows,” and took it to the Hollywood International High Definition Film Festival in Los Angeles. It won.

The “Best Full Length Motion Picture for Drama” (One of the most prestigious awards given by the festival), “Out of the Shadows” proved to Averill that Mantis and Moon had a shot at being more than an under-the-radar production company. Today, Mantis and Moon are currently seeking distribution, filming their second project, a travel documentary on Central and South America, and beginning production on an ambitious third project that will delve deep into the financial heart of Americans.

Speaking in calm, modest tone, Averill explains the surrealism of that first award. “The first picture was a Sideways-esque flick where a couple of guys marriages crash and burn and they try to get a grip on life. One is the eternal optimist. The other is the pragmatic pessimist. They view life differently and hash out their ideologies throughout the movie,” says Averill. “Well, I’ll be damned, we submitted it to our first festival, went out there, showed it, and won! Basically we were surprised as anybody. There were 1,100 submissions, and we won one of the 33 awards -- we were stoked. It was our first effort ever,” he says.

Averill and his cohorts at Mantis and Moon, including Vice President Will Graver, are currently seeking distribution for the film, something Averill seemed optimistic about. “We’ll be able to distribute somewhere. How grand the scale is or what they’re willing to do is the question mark. If we get any distro offer, I’m thrilled to death. We were never even looking to making the money back,” he says.

The next project is the one that Averill speaks the most enthusiastically about. It is a probing exploration of the nations economic situation, especially concerning the inevitable end of Social Security. Of Mantis and Moons planned documentaries, Averill says this is the “more socially poignant one.”

“The documentary is called ‘Wants and Needs’ and examines the ultimate, inevitable financial issues faced by the problems in the macro economic policy of the US Government and how that’s going to be inherited by, basically, us; the younger generation,” explains Averill

With a slew of ambitious projects planned, and the impressive success of their very first effort, Averill and Mantis and Moon are looking forward to a strong future. Most of their pending releases are slated for 2007 and beyond, so be patient. Quality takes time.

Keep posted to City Paper for local screenings of “Out of the Shadows,” learn more at mantisandmoon.com. Great Picture Great Picture

Mantis and Moon to Close out the May Movies on Adams St.

Adams Street Film Series

Everyone handles their life spinning out of control in different ways. Some stay optimistic; others stay pissed at the world, which is captured in Mantis and Moon’s drama Out of the Shadows, which closes the Adams Street Film Series. On Thursday, May 26, the Hollywood International HD Festival winning film wraps up the ASFS series on the projector screen outside The Attic on Adams. Following two men who come to terms with the inevitable crumbling of their marriages with completely opposite outlooks, the two friends learn from and console each other, finding each other’s unique perspective essential to moving forward. Free. 10pm. The Attic, 1701 Adams St. 419-243-5350. www.mantisandmoon.com

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Toledo Filmmaker to Present Double Feature

Christopher Borrelli

Carleton Averill is brave.

He is 44, he lives in Toledo, he works days as a financial planner, and he is currently in pre-production on his third film, which he plans to send to Sundance, and which will be titled:

Nothing Happened

But oh yes, something does happen, he explains. Something apocalyptic, in fact. The government collapses, not due to an asteroid or terrorist plot, but fiscal mismanagement. There is a rush on the market, and bonds are down-rated, and there isn’t a real event so much that happens, just a culmination of things, so the media tells people to stay at home and expect power outages. Ans there’s more, but it sounds like quite the long story.

Anyway, that’s on the burner.

To check out what this Toledo filmmaker has already shot, right under your noses, in your backyard (while you were at work, probably), head to the Maumee Indoor Theatre tomorrow night for a Carleton double feature. Billed as an evening of Mantis and Moon Productions named for the production house Averill started with filmmaker Will Graver, 25 the program features his first movie, Out of the Shadows, and his experimental documentary, Thunder on the Farm. Shadows, he says, is about a pessimist and an optimist, both going through divorce; the pessimist has a bad time and the optimist stays optimistic, so his aspirations come to fruition. Farm, he explains, is about summers progress, seen through the eyes of a farm

Both pictures were shot on hi-def video, with a cast and crew entirely gathered from the Toledo area. And Mantis and Moon Productions wants it to stay that way. Graver, who started as Averills intern and graduated to vice president of the two-person company, said they operate a bit like summer regional theater. There’s a lot of people around here who want to be part of a production and they will volunteer just to be a part. I understand. I’m like that. I’m in Ohio, and I have a job working on movies, and that’s about the best thing I can do at this point.

 
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Thunder on the Mountain

Our Town Sylvania

Sylvania Film Company Gets OK For Movies To Show on PBS

Two movies by Mantis and Moon film production company, owned by Cap Averill II of Sylvania, have been approved for national distribution on Public Broadcasting Stations.

The approval, by the National Educational Telecommunications Associations, is for association members, such as numerous PBS stations throughout the country. That means the movies will play to a wider audience.

Approved for Mantis and Moon were Thunder on the Mountain in the Thunder Series, as well as the documentary Wants and Needs. The original Thunder Series project. Thunder on the Farm, was resubmitted after a previous run and was also accepted.

The Mantis and Moon’s Thunder Series depicts the symbolic balance between man and the environment. Wants and Needs is about a five-year study on cyclical recession and depressions.

The National Education Telecommunications Association serves public television licenses and educational entitles across the country. WGTE-TV’s Darren LaShelle was supportive of the approval of the local movies.

Sylvania Herald

Ohio Film Company Receives International Film Festival Recognition

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Wants and Needs

The Blade

Local Documentary Explores Recession

In this presidential election season, there’s a lot of finger pointing about the cause of our current economic mess.

Wants and Needs, a new documentary co-production between WGTE-TV, Channel 30, and Mantis and Moon Moving Pictures and Sound, a Toledo film production company, makes a strong case that we, the general public, are as much to blame for the ongoing fiscal crisis as those in Washington or Wall Street.

Premiering at 4 p.m. Sunday on WGTE (PBS). Wants and Needs says economic booms and busts are cyclical patterns that can be traced as far back as hundreds of years ago in Holland.

More relevant to our times, the documentary explores the three biggest monetary crises in our nations history, beginning with the first Great Depression (later renamed the Long Depression) that ran from 1873 through 1896, then in the 1930s with the Great Depression, and now our own Great Recession.

The cyclical nature of these feast-famine periods goes something like this: a generation only beginning to enjoy a mass of wealth and prosperity experiences a sudden and perilous financial free fall that causes widespread economic strife. Almost overnight, a wide group of social tiers is transformed from those who want to those who need. This sobering change in circumstance and outlook has a lifetime of repercussions, including how the Needs Generation in turn raises their families.

Not wanting their children to go without as they did, the Needs Generation focuses on the wants of their sons and daughters in addition to the Needs, and a generation of Wants is created. The spending and spoiling continues through three generational cycles -- in modern times, the Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y -- until past fiscal lessons are lost or forgotten, the inflated bubble of prosperity pops again, and the cycle is repeated.

One of the bigger culprits in this cycle is the Needs Generation, who are unwilling to recollect and/or share their lifetime of strife and hardscrabble existence with the Wants Generations that follow.

This is an oversimplification of the documentary’s methodical, almost textbook presentation of its message, but the point is made.

Wants and Needs is co-hosted by Gordon Ward and Cap Averill II. Averill spent six years making the documentary, which is not a political-minded firm, rather, as Ward says, it’s to examine “the effects that generations have on cyclical recessions or depressions”

Other than news channel sound bites of political and financial leaders, the film almost exclusively features local commentary, including Kevin Quinn, an economics professor at Bowling Green State University. Gary Leitzell, the independent mayor of Dayton, and Donna Counts, who, in 2006 at the age of 88, foresaw the economic collapse a year before it happened based, one surmises, on her experiences living through the Great Depression

“We’re going to be in a real fix one of these days,” she says during her film interview. “I don’t know if I feel sorry for the younger ones. In some ways I do and in some ways I don’t. But someday there’s going to be a rude awakening and it’s going to be in my lifetime, and I firmly believe that.”

 

The Society

The Blade

Auditions Set for Sylvania Movie

Spanish Speaking Talent Sought for Production

David Patch

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Mantis and Moon Shoot Parts of Film at Wingate Hotel

Sylvania’s Wingate Hotel was the scene of filming on today for a locally produced movie, The Society.

Mantis and Moon’s production, a movie produced by Sylvania resident Cap Averill II, is set in Bogotá, Columbia, where much of the filming has been completed. Production of the movie began in 2006

With help from the Sylvania Area Chamber of Commerce, part of the film has been shot in Sylvania. Some footage already has been shot on Main Street, at the municipal building, several residences, and the Sylvania Court House

The Society, Mr. Averill has said, is part romantic, comedy, and part legal drama and is set in the 1970’s

Several hundred people auditioned six months ago and the movie has been filming since last August. A cast of 40-50 principals will be used and another call for extras will take place before more filming commences.

He is shooting the film with his partner, Zachary Gordon. Mr. Gordon (was director of photography) the company’s first film, Out of the Shadows, in 2004

Rehearsals to Start in March In Sylvania for ‘The Society’ Movie Mantis and Moon Productions has finished casting ant it’s filming in Bogotá, Columbia for The Society, and rehearsals will begin this month in Sylvania.

The scenes will be used but the movie will not indicate the northwest Ohio city is part of the films story. The filming is expected to use 1970s-era vehicles to drive and park on Sylvania streets to support the storys time period. The movie is part romantic comedy and part legal drama.

The movie, the first to be shot in the city, is being produced by Sylvania resident Cap Averill, owner of Mantis and Moon. He also manages Cap Averill II and Associates, Inc., an insurance company in Toledo.

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Local Director Gets Film Cast and Crew Together

Amid the clink of wine glasses Monday evening in Chandler Cafe in downtown Sylvania, the talk was of movies, and especially of one called The Society, which is scheduled to start shooting scenes on Main Street in lat May.

Director and screenwriter Cap Averill II held a reception for his cast so they could meet and get to know each other. It also was an opportunity to recruit extras.

“This is the first time the entire cast and crew got together,” he explained Mr. Averill, 49, lives in Delta but grew up in Sylvania, where he graduated from Northview High School.

He described his movie as part romance and part legal drama. The romance was based on his own life with his wife, Jenny, who is from Colombia, he said. Filming was done in the country’s capital of Bogotá with the cooperation of that country’s military and film commission.

Mr. Averill plans to show the movie to film festivals around the nation.

Cast member Mike Roberts said he plays a character named Jeff, but he hadn’t yet read the script. Still, he wasn’t worried. He said he has acted before. He lives in Bryan and is a project manager for a fabrication shop in Indiana.

Valerie Lucio and Anna Maria Ponce, both of Toledo, said they were cast as Jurors.

Neither of them have acted before. They had not read the script either, and weren’t sure if they had speaking parts. Ms. Lucio is a retired postal worker and Ms. Ponce is employed by Buckeye Cable System, which is owned by the Blades parent company.

Mr. Averills day job is financial planning. Movie making is an avocation. He said his film will cost less than $100,000, and is not expected to break even. Funding has been raised from donors.

To the donors, “I kept saying ‘we’re not going to make any money, we’re not going to make any money. And did I say ‘we’re not going to make any money?’”

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Movie Shot in Sylvania Set For Dec. Showings

For Sylvanias first film, it’s nearly a wrap.

After three years of filming mostly in Bogotá, Colombia and some in Sylvania. The Society, directed by local filmmaker Cap Averill II, concluded filming last year and is in the midst of post-production.

The romance/legal drama, a $250,000 independent project of Mr. Averills company, Mantis and Moon Productions and shot with partner Zachary Gordon, is set for release in about December.

“This is the part where we’re finished and taking a step back to look at the finished product,” said the Sylvania resident, who also runs a Toledo investment firm. “We’re at the fun part, with all the hard work behind us.”

Aside from planning the cast party to be held in the upcoming months, Mr. Averill said, the next tasks for his team include devising a way to smoothly juxtapose the scenes in Bogotá with those shot in Sylvania. Mr. Averill, along with musicians from the Toledo School of Arts, has begun work on the soundtrack, comprised of both American and traditional Colombian themes.

Mr. Averill, who attended school in Sylvania, said his personal ties to the city and its Midwestern feel made the city a natural choice. He praised Sylvania as an easy place to work, and cited old friends, the police, and Sylvania Area Chamber of Commerce for enabling the project to take place.

About 150 to 200 people worked on the film, not including extras, at least 15 of whom were from Sylvania. Some filming was done in Sylvania, including at the Wingate Hotel

Mr. Averill said the initial production of the movie started in 2006, he had a casting call in Sylvania in 2011, and he began filming in Bogotá in 2012.

Unsure of whether the story would be more a romance or a legal drama, Mr. Averill chose to film it as both, shooting scenes from both perspectives to give himself room to experiment. While reviewing the shots, he decided the plot worked best as a mix of both styles.

The movie is set in the 1970’s and, Mr. Averill previously said, is about two lovers who struggle with social, cultural, and theological disagreements.

The film industry tends to reinforce negative stereotypes of Colombia as a dark heaven for drug trafficking and other illicit behavior, Mr. Averill said, which he hopes his film can help to overturn.

“In our movie, the typical machine guns and cocaine will be conspicuous by their absence,” he said. “We’re showing the country as it is, not as how it’s portrayed by Hollywood.

The film represents a number of firsts for Mr. Averill, he said, including his first motion picture since founding Mantis and Moon in Toledo and the first to be shot in ultra-high definition. Following it’s release, he hopes to submit it to independent festivals.

Other projects for Mantis and Moon, he said, have included the nationally acclaimed Thunder documentaries. Thunder on the Mountain, one of three in the nature-focused series, was recently selected by the National Education Television Association for countrywide PBS stations.

Although The Society is fictional, Mr. Averill said, the romance is based on how he and his Colombian wife met. His ”secret intention,” he said, is for the film to be a lasting record of their relationship for his son.

“He’s just three, but one day I have that to look forward to,” he said

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Local Producer Cap Averill Unveils The Society

Northwest Ohio resident and movie producer Cap Averill – Mantis and Moon unveiled his new movie “The Society” for the cast, crew, supporters and media at The Ohio Theater. Based on a true story, the film will now be entered into the film festival circuit with hopes of scoring big with judges.

This is the second collaboration on a full motion picture between Averill and Zachary Gordon, who acted as cinematographer. Their first movie entitled “Out Of the Shadows” won a Hollywood International High Definition Award for the best full length motion picture in 2005.

The plot follows a resident of Sylvania, Ohio who meets an attorney from Bogotá, Colombia online. The movie follows their relationship from falling in love to going through the trials and tribulations of establishing a household together in America.

This love story quickly turns into a legal drama about how greedy management can take advantage of people and misuse their power. “The Society” explores how these wrongdoings can have a ripple effect, touching the lives of many while. The significant theme is how wrongdoing pushes people to the brink with destruction and dissension occurring between honest friends; it is pragmatic but not without hope.

He worked with the Colombian Film Commission to be allowed to film in Bogotá using Colombian Special Forces. Working in Columbia was enjoyable says Averill, adding “what we know of Columbia is really not what is going on; it is a beautiful country.”

Shooting Locally

The United State scenes were shot in Sylvania, Wauseon and Toledo, Ohio. Averill approached the Sylvania Chamber of Commerce for assistance and the organization saw the benefits of showing their community to the film festival circuit. Sylvania Police assisted in the making of the film – handling the logistics of getting the film equipment down the city’s street. 

Auditions were held and many NW Ohio local residents were cast in roles as extras; many with speaking parts in the drama. The Honorable James E. Barber, Fulton County Common Pleas Court Judge has his acting debut in the film. He portrays the Judge in the epic courtroom battle between Greg Hill Jr and The Society.

Making Music

The scoring was done under the direction of noted composer Pierre O’Reilly. His path to a music career has been far from straightforward. He served as 3rd and 2nd Navigating Officer in the Merchant Navy for 4 years where he met Averill on a Mediterranean cruise – they kept in touch and much later a score was born for the film.

Mantis and Moon also has three documentaries in the “Thunder Series” nationally televised on Public Television and distributed by the National Educational Television Association as well as the studio’s most recent work, a financial documentary “Wants and Needs.”

Our Town Sylvania

It’s been a couple of years in the making and nearly a year since it had a casting call in Sylvania, but in March a film called The Society by a Toledo movie production company will be shooting in Sylvania.

The shooting by Mantis and Moon, led by a Sylvania resident, began last week and continues in Bogotá, Columbia. The company said it plans to do some filming this spring in Sylvania and the Sylvania Area Chamber of Commerce helped arrange the needed settings, including Main Street, the municipal building and courthouse, and several residences.

This is the first film to be shot in the city, officials said.

“Everybody’s excited,” said Pat Nowak, the Sylvania chamber’s executive director and public relations manger for Mantis and Moon. “People want to see it happen.”

The producer said in a statement that the movie is part romantic comedy and part legal drama.

Hundreds of people auditioned for the film last spring and summer. The cast was selected on Jan. 18, the company said, and includes Victor Pytko, who played Merle Huss in the 2011 film Cedar Rapids. A call for extras will take place in the spring. Those interested can contact the chamber for more information at 419-882-2135.

The plan nearly a year ago was to start filming last summer. Jesus “Chuy” Delosantos, Mantis and Moon’s production coordinator at the time, said Sylvania “opened up their doors and made it easy for us.” The casting call in downtown Sylvania last year was looking for a male 35 to 45 years old and a female 25 to 35 years old, and for the characters to speak English and Spanish, preferably Colombian-accented Spanish. The script, the coordinator said, had 38 adult speaking roles.

Although some shooting will be done in Sylvania possibly using 1970s-era vehicles to drive and park on Sylvania streets to support the story’s time period, Sylvania will be part of The Society.

“The entire shoot will take place in the capital city of Bogotá,” executive producer Cap Averill said in a statement. He was not available to comment Wednesday. The production is using a Red One high-definition camera.

Mr. Averill, 48, of Sylvania, attended Ohio State University and graduated from the Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara, Calif. He also manages Cap Averill II and Associates, Inc., a financial planning company in Toledo.

He is shooting the film with his partner, Zachary Gordon. Mr. Gordon directed the company’s first film, Out of the Shadows, in 2004. He received an award for that in the Hollywood international high-definition festival. Mantis and Moon is known for its nature documentaries, including Thunder on the Farm, photographed on the Delta property of Mr. Averill.

Mr. Averill said in a statement that two plots of the story meet in the film when two lovers struggle with social, cultural, and theological disagreements.

He added: “It asks the pivotal questions like, what is justice to you. What would be the personal and financial cost of seeking that justice.”

This is an independent film, which he plans to send to various festivals and to the Independent Film Channel. The budget for the film was not available.

Contact Ashley Streichert at astreichert@theblade.com or 419-206-0356.

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“We’re going to try to get a sweeping shot for the aesthetics, to contrast against Bogotá, Colombia. That’s quite a contrast,” said local film director Cap Averill II on Sept. 9 as he prepared to travel in a crane down Main Street shooting film footage. Averill said there are about 30 days of filming yet to be done on his newest dramatic project ‘The Society.’ in Sylvania they will be filming at the Wingate Hotel, Chandler Cafe, the courthouse, the administration building and Flower Hospital. More outdoor filming will take place in Delta, Ohio. Averill’s 2005 film ‘Out of the Shadows’ was awarded ‘Best Feature Length Drama’ out of 1,100 submissions at its premiere at the Hollywood International HD DV festival.

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Sylvania Police officers Chris Roby, Todd Ziolkowski, and Sgt. Justin Music assisted with the safety aspect as the film crew worked in downtown Sylvania. Though the police are not appearing in the film, about 300 Sylvanians are. Averill said that he is using all local people in the production, and about 50 have speaking lines. Averill, who says he tries to do things that have socially redeeming value, spends most of his time and energy on his career as a financial planner. Filming is done on vacation time. For more about Cap Averill’s filming projects visit mantisandmoon.com

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Sylvania to be Scene of a New Movie, 'The Society'

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'The Society' Cast and Crew Celebrate at Chandler Cafe

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Film Production Takes Place at Wingate by Wyndham Hotel

Movie director Cap Averill and his Mantis & Moon crew spent a snowy Saturday shooting scenes for his current film “The Society” at the Wingate by Wyndham Hotel on Main Street in Sylvania. “The people have been very nice at Wingate,” commented Mr. Averill, a Sylvania native. “Unfortunately, with the weather we were tracking in snow and mud with all of our heavy equipment. We offered to take care of it but they took care of everything, and they also supplied the food we needed for props.” The movie crew spent about 4 hours on board room and meeting scenes. “It was nice having them here,” said Wingate sales manager Allison Stout. “It seemed just like any other real meeting that takes place here.” The next time film production takes place in Sylvania will be March, at the courthouse at the Chamber of Commerce

Included in the Wingate scenes were Victor Pytko, Charles Naccarato, David Hancock, Ralph Meyer, Richard Hingst, Anita Farrar, Dr. Paul Rega, Morris Sullivan, Mari Stewart, Linda Goodwin, Phillip McDermott, Ronald Bradley, and Horst Wudi.

With help from Sylvania Area Chamber of Commerce the drama is being filmed in several areas of Sylvania, on Main Street, at the municipal building, several residences and the Sylvania Court House. Several hundred people auditioned six months ago and the movie has been filming since last August. A cast of 40-50 principals will be used and a call for extras will take place before the film commences.

Mantis and Moon President Cap Averill states “The Society, is one part international romantic comedy and one part ”keep it real” legal drama. “The Society” asks the pivotal questions - What is justice to you? What would be the personal and financial cost of seeking that justice? Would those costs outweigh the benefit in the end? More importantly what are the real chances of winning?”

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“The Society” To be Shown at Special Screening

Northwest Ohio resident and movie producer Cap Averill of Mantis and Moon will unveil his new movie, “The Society,” for the cast, crew, supporters and media on Oct. 3. The movie, based on a true story, will be shown at The Ohio Theater, 3112 Lagrange St., Toledo. After unveiling, “The Society” will be entered into the film festival circuit. Though ticket fees for the movie will not be charged, donations for Growing Hopes Farms, which is a not-for-profit entity designed to assist autistic people in having complete, well-adjusted and happy lives, will be accepted.

“The Society” is a love story, initially revealing the back story of Greg, a resident of Sylvania, Ohio, who meets an attorney from Bogotá, Colombia, online. The movie follows their relationship from falling in love to going through the trials and tribulations of getting a United States visa.

This love story quickly turns into a legal drama about how greedy management can take advantage of people and misuse their power. “The Society explores how these wrongdoings can have a ripple effect, touching the lives of many while affecting them in an impossible way. The significant theme is how wrongdoing pushes people to the brink with destruction and dissension occurring between honest friends. The movie is pragmatic but not without hope; it is as much about the triumph as it is about overcoming the process.

The film was written between 2006 and 2012. It was shot partly in Bogotá, Colombia, working with the Colombian film Commission and with the help of Colombian Special Forces.

The United States scenes were shot in Sylvania, Wauseon, and Toledo, Ohio. The city of Sylvania and Mayor Craig Stough graciously opened up the town for the movie and Sylvania Police Officer Justin Music assisted in the making of the film.

Laura Glover and The Sylvania Area Chamber of Commerce coordinated the use of several Sylvania locations including the Administration Building, the Flower Hospital, Wingate Hotel and the Chamber offices as well as cranes in the streets of Sylvania used to shoot sweeping shots of the city. In addition, local Sylvania resident Kyle Wisniewski was the assistant director for production and post production

Northwest Ohio local residents were cast in roles as extras, many with speaking parts in the drama. The Honorable James E Barber, a Fulton County Judge, has his acting debut in the film

He portrays the Judge in the epic courtroom scenes in the historic courthouse in Wauseon, Ohio. The courthouse was a character in and of itself with its rich history and was a notable addition to the film.

The scoring was done under the direction of noted composer Pierre O’Reilly. His path to a music career has been far from straightforward. He served as 3rd and 2nd Navigating Officer in the Merchant Navy for four years where he met Averill on a Mediterranean cruise. They kept in touch and much later a score was born for the film.

After leaving the Navy, O’Reilly decided to pursue his passion of music. A graduate of the Royal College of Music and currently based in London, Pierre is a composer and producer, specializing in music for screen. In 2013, he was the recipient of The Worshipful Company of Musicians Silver Medal.

His career to date has seen him collaborate with Academy Award nominated director Nicky Phelan and BAFTA-nominated director Eamonn O’Neill. Pierre has worked as arranger/orchestrator on the production of ‘Titanic LIVE’, which premiered at London’s Royal Albert Hall in April 2015.

This is the second collaboration on a full motion picture between Averill and Zachary Gordon, who acted as cinematographer. Their first movie, entitled “Out Of the Shadows,” won the Hollywood International High Definition Award for the best full length motion picture of the festival in 2005. The seven-day festival, held at Paramount Studios in Hollywood, awarded Averill and his co-writer Kim Kalouria the highest honor out of 1,100 films.

Mantis and Moon also has three documentaries in the “Thunder Series” nationally televised on Public Television and distributed by the National Educational Television Association, and their most recent, a financial documentary called “Wants and Needs.”

WTOL

Sylvania Chosen for Independent Film Location

The city of Sylvania has been chosen as the shooting location for an independent film.

The film The Society will begin rehearsals in Sylvania in early March. Filmmakers have already begun to shoot the movie in Bogotá, Columbia, and will be heading to northwest Ohio after that.

The "small town appeal" of Main Street, the Municipal Building, and several homes is a draw to these and many other movie makers.

"I definitely think there's a lot of potential for small towns. I mean, a lot of movies now have vintage shots or need that smaller community where they can move effortlessly." says Pat Nowak of the Chamber of Commerce.

The Sylvania Chamber of Commerce says that this is the first major production that has ever taken place in the city. Nowak says the town is very excited about the project.

Maumee has also heard from a few production companies, but nothing has been serious yet.

The historic Maumee Theater was used for a documentary on Current TV. Maumee City Administrator John Jezak told WTOL about that project:

"They chose the Maumee Indoor Theatre out of all the theaters in all the 50 states, and they spent about 3000 dollars to go ahead and film it."

Jezak says that small town governments are accommodating to movies, and only charge companies for things like shutting down roads or using police. He says the American small town will always have a traditional appeal.

The company has finished casting the film's leads, but there will be a call for extras. There is no release date set for The Society, either